New Missouri Governor Mike Parson continues listening tour - WSIL-TV 3 Southern Illinois

New Missouri Governor Mike Parson continues listening tour

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SIKESTON, Mo.-- Local leaders in South East Missouri met with Governor Mike Parson in Sikeston while on his listening tour. 

Sate Senator Doug Libla attended the event at Three Rivers College. One of his main concerns -as former chairman of transportation - is the cost of materials needed for infrastructure projects.

"In 2018 the cost of concrete, asphalt, steel, and building roads and bridges has increased two to three times," Libla said. 

While State Representative Stephen Cookson would like to see a focus on ports and railways, "We are in the center of the United States with the major rivers coming here, so our ports to get our products directly to world markets." 

Fortunately, Governor Parson wants to make infrastructure a top priority for his administration,"We can not just keep kicking this can down the road and not doing anything with our highways, our bridges, our airports, our rivers and our railway."

Parson also wanted to commend lawmakers on working together during several months of turmoil while scandals plagued former governor Eric Greitens, which eventually forced him to resign. 

“I never in my career have seen the legislators in both the house and senate work as hard as they did this year, they kept their nose to the grindstone," Parson said. 

In return, local leaders praised Parson for wanting to move forward with bipartisanship and welcome him back to visit again. "I talked with his staff and his and him personally. He’s going to be here quiet often," Cookson said. 

Following his departure, the governor continued on to St. Louis, marking his last stop on the tour. 

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