Summer reading tips for kids - WSIL-TV 3 Southern Illinois

Summer reading tips for kids

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MURPHYSBORO, Ill. -- Groups around southern Illinois are working to get young children excited about reading this summer.

Loretta Broomfield serves as the library director at the Sallie Logan Public Library in Murphysboro. With school being out, she encourages consistent reading to prevent summer reading loss. 

“Should always make time, at least half an hour day, at least, I think that’s pretty reasonable," Broomfield said. “There have been a lot of studies on that, when kids start school after the summer, if they don’t read, that they’ve regressed so that just kind of helps them keep their reading skills up.”

She said there are different ways you can get children more engaged in reading, like reading challenges.

“Example, read a book with a purple cover or read a book that has your name in the title or the main character in the book is the same as yours, read a book that was written in the year that you were born, so just come up with fun lists like that,” Broomfield said.

The Sallie Logan Public Library recently received a $1500 grant that will help them purchase new books for the library.

The library will offer free programs on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday this summer, and you don’t have to be a library card holder to participate. Library leaders hope to see many faces come out this summer. 

“It is important, not only in the summer, but all the time, especially over the summer to make it easier for the teacher and the students once school starts in the fall,” Broomfield said.

June 22nd is the last day to sign children up for the reading program. There will also be a celebration for students who read their way through the summer on July 25th.

For more information or to sign your kids up, you can visit here.

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