Health - WSIL-TV 3 Southern Illinois

House Call: Stigma Free Week coming to JALC Video included

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CARTERVILLE -- Many times a mental illness diagnosis also comes with a lot of stigmas attached.

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Obamacare may have helped more Americans quit smoking

States that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act saw a greater increase in low-income adults who quit smoking than did states that did not expand Medicaid, a new study found.

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WSIL and American Red Cross team up for fall blood drive

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CARBONDALE -- Every two seconds in America, another person needs a blood transfusion but only five percent of the population actually donates.

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'Boomers' doing better at avoiding eye disease of aging

Macular degeneration is a major cause of vision loss in older Americans. But new research shows that baby boomers are somehow avoiding the illness at higher rates than their parents did.

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Why a headache feels so draining

For many people, nothing's more draining than a throbbing headache or toothache. Scientists now think they know why.

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Weighing too much or too little when pregnant can be risky

For women contemplating having a baby, new research adds to the evidence suggesting that starting a pregnancy at a normal weight is best.

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Is meth use destroying vets' hearts?

Methamphetamine appears to be damaging the hearts of U.S. military veterans at an increasing rate, researchers report.

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WSIL Blood Drives this weekend Video included

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WSIL -- This weekend you can help us help save lives at WSIL blood drives.    

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Medical professionals recommend low-dose CT scans to prevent lung cancer Video included

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CARTERVILLE -- Lung Cancer rates are on the rise in southern Illinois.

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Definition of high blood pressure drops

Nearly half of all adult Americans will be considered to have high blood pressure under new guidelines issued Monday by the nation's top heart health organizations.

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Younger people with diabetes have 7 times greater risk of sudden heart death

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(HealthDay News) -- People younger than 50 with diabetes have a seven-times higher risk of dying from sudden cardiac death, preliminary research suggests. 

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Binge-watchers, beware: long tv time poses clot risk

If you love to while away a weekend watching a season's worth of episodes from a favorite TV series, you may inadvertently put yourself at risk for developing a dangerous blood clot.

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House Call: Lung Cancer Awareness Month Video included

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CARTERVILLE -- November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, and while deaths are declining nationally, that is not the case in southern Illinois.   

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Switching to whole grain foods could trim your waistline

Put down that forkful of perfectly twirled white spaghetti, and grab a plate of whole grain pasta instead.

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Does your pet have a weight problem? Here's how to tell

Cats with diabetes, dogs with cancer, birds with high cholesterol or even rabbits who cannot turn around to clean themselves -- what do these animals all have in common?

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A dangerous new twist on cyberbullying

As if the idea of teen cyberbullying isn't harrowing enough, a new study warns of a strange twist in which kids anonymously post hurtful messages -- to themselves.

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Yoga may give lung cancer patients, caregivers a boost

For advanced lung cancer patients, yoga appears to help improve their overall physical function, stamina and mental health.

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Helping children cope when a mass tragedy strikes

Mass slayings, like the church shooting in Texas Sunday that left at least 26 dead, are hard enough for adults to comprehend. For children, these tragedies can make the world seem like a terrifying place.

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Older women can 'walk away from the grim reaper'

Ladies, slip on your sneakers and walk briskly every day, and you might prolong your life.

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Women's Health Naturally! Expo & Workshops Video included

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CARBONDALE -- The Women's Health Naturally! Expo and Workshops comes back to Carbondale. It's Saturday, Nov. 11.

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Social media can help boost weight loss success

Struggling to lose weight? Maybe posting that selfie on social media can help, researchers say.

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House Call: Upcoming event covers gut health Video included

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HERRIN -- Gut health has a big impact on your skin.  There's a free event discussing the topic on Tuesday, Nov. 14.  

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About half of Americans get health care in ER

When Americans need medical care, almost one in two people choose the emergency room, a new study reveals.

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5 ways to eat more veggies

It's a healthy habit we try to instill in our kids though we don't always do it ourselves -- eating more vegetables every day.

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Are artery-opening stents for chest pain a waste of time?

With findings that some experts believe could change cardiovascular care, a new study suggests that the placebo effect of stents in heart patients with chest pain may be far more pronounced than thought.

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Do rising cancer drug prices warrant regulation?

Cancer drug prices in the United States keep rising steadily, a new study says.

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'Drug courts,' treatment focus of new White House opioid strategy

Steering opioid addicts toward treatment programs instead of prisons, while tightening federal policies on opioid prescribing, could curb the opioid epidemic, President Donald Trump's opioid crisis commission said Wednesday.

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Rheumatoid arthritis linked to risk of COPD

People with rheumatoid arthritis appear to have a higher risk of the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), researchers report.

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Where do grains fit in your diet?

To cut calories, you may be tempted to cut out carbs in the form of grains. But that could be a mistake -- for a variety of reasons.

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Kids' high blood pressure often overlooked

One in every 30 children in the United States has high blood pressure. Now, new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics may help doctors screen children 3 years and older for the condition.

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Gene therapy may fight brain cancer's return

A new form of gene therapy shows promise in battling recurrent brain cancer.

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House Call: Breast cancer survivorship Video included

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CARTERVILLE -- Hope is one word all cancer patients and their caregivers share. As we wrap up Breast Cancer Awareness Month we're talking about the importance of support. 

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Botox may offer new hope for young migraine sufferers

Botox injections may help bring relief to children suffering from migraines, a small study suggests.

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Could cataract surgery lengthen older women's lives?

Women who undergo cataract surgery may get an unexpected dividend: longer life.

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Controversial chemical can linger on your toothbrush

Triclosan -- a potentially harmful antibacterial agent used in some toothpastes -- accumulates in toothbrush bristles, researchers report.

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Are HIV and AIDS poised for a comeback?

The advent of powerful drugs in the mid-1990s brought remarkable gains in survival for HIV patients who had access to the medications.

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Trauma takes a toll on half of U.S. kids

Nearly half of American children have faced at least one traumatic experience, such as the death of a parent, witnessing a violent crime or living with someone who is suicidal or abuses drugs or alcohol, new research reveals.

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What you may not know about ovarian cancer

In a report that will likely surprise many women, researchers say most cases of ovarian cancer originate in the fallopian tubes, not the ovaries.

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High-nicotine e-cigs may be gateway to smoking for teens

Teens who vape e-cigarettes with higher nicotine levels are more likely to start smoking conventional cigarettes soon after, new research shows.

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Can aspirin stop liver cancer in Hepatitis B patients?

Daily aspirin may reduce the risk of liver cancer for people with hepatitis B infection, a new study suggests.

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House Call: Breast cancer imaging guidelines Video included

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CARBONDALE -- All month we've focused on breast cancer in our House Call segments. 

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Even a little walking can lengthen your life

That evening stroll you take after dinner most nights may be doing you more good than you realize -- new research suggests even a bit of regular walking can reduce your risk of death.

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'Know More' event for PTSD comes to JALC

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CARTERVILLE -- This Able Veteran is holding an event in November to help veterans around the region.  

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Skip opioid treatment for migraine in the ER

For people seeking treatment for a migraine in the emergency room, a commonly prescribed opioid called hydromorphone (Dilaudid or Exalgo) doesn't seem to work as well as at least one other medication, a new study finds.

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How foods labeled 'healthy' can still make you fat

Be careful when you reach for foods labeled "healthy" -- new research suggests if they have hidden high levels of sugar, you may snack more later.

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Could 'AI' become a partner in breast cancer care?

Machines armed with artificial intelligence may one day help doctors better identify high-risk breast lesions that might turn into cancer, new research suggests.

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Common exercise therapy may not help women with leaky bladder

A commonly promoted exercise purported to help a woman control a leaky bladder probably isn't effective, experts say.

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Can 'magic mushrooms' kick-start depression treatment?

The active ingredient in "magic mushrooms" may help patients with tough-to-treat depression, a new study suggests.

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House Call: Effects of radiation

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WSIL -- Breast cancer patients typically go through chemotherapy and/or radiation as part of their treatment. 

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More women choose breast reconstruction after mastectomy

Over five years, the proportion of U.S. breast cancer patients opting for breast reconstruction after mastectomy grew by about two-thirds, a new government report shows.

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Breast cancer screenings still best for early detection

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States, and routine screenings remain the most reliable way to detect the disease early, a breast cancer expert says.

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Pump may beat shots for type 1 diabetes

In young people with type 1 diabetes, insulin pump therapy may offer better blood sugar control and fewer complications than daily injections of the vital hormone, new German research suggests.

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Can sauna sweats lower your blood pressure?

Frequent sauna bathers might be boosting their heart health as they sweat, new research suggests.

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World Mental Health Day & resources for help

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WSIL -- October 10 is World Mental Health Day. It's estimated that one in four people experience some kind of mental health problem in their lifetime.  

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Flu shot key for people with diabetes

With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people -- particularly those with diabetes -- to get vaccinated.

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How breast cancer gene mutations raise risk of tumors

Scientists say they've spotted how mutations in the BRCA1 gene can trigger breast cancer.

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Americans more open about mental health issues, but stigma lingers

Americans may be more willing to talk about mental health issues these days, but misperceptions and stigmas persist, a new survey finds.

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Breast cancer's decline may have saved 322,000 lives

New research finds the number of American women who've lost their lives to breast cancer has fallen precipitously in the past 25 years, with more than 322,000 lives saved in that time.

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Start Seeing Pink initiative is underway

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CARBONDALE --  The Start Seeing Pink initiative is underway again at SIU.  

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House Call: Breast cancer risk factors

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WSIL -- October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Each Monday, our House Call segment will feature information about this disease.  

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Whooping cough shot works, but many moms-to-be skip it: CDC

Tdap vaccination during pregnancy prevents whooping cough in about three-quarters of newborns -- but only about half of mothers-to-be get the shot, a new U.S. study reveals.

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Coffee doesn't help Parkinson's motor disorders

Regular cups of coffee will not ease tremors and movement problems caused by Parkinson's disease, despite prior evidence that caffeine might help, a new clinical trial reports.

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Postpartum depression likely to recur with future pregnancies

Women who have suffered from postpartum depression are more likely to go through it again after subsequent pregnancies, a new Danish study shows.

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Putting wine on a diet

Do you enjoy a glass of wine with dinner or when unwinding at the end of a long day, but wonder how its calories are affecting your diet?

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Yoga may bring better sleep to breast cancer patients

A certain type of yoga may provide lasting benefits for breast cancer patients who have trouble sleeping, researchers report.

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Asthma drug tied to nightmares, depression

The asthma medication Singulair (montelukast) appears linked to neuropsychiatric side effects, such as depression, aggression, nightmares and headaches, according to a new review by Dutch researchers.

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House Call: Pediatric rehab

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WSIL -- September is pediatric cancer awareness month and a common treatment for children involves physical therapy to overcome effects of radiation and chemotherapy.     

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Selena Gomez's kidney transplant puts lupus center stage

When pop star Selena Gomez revealed Thursday that she had a kidney transplant, she put the autoimmune disease lupus in the spotlight.

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Smoking, poor diet lead global death causes

Tobacco caused 7.1 million deaths worldwide in 2016, and poor diet was associated with 1 in 5 deaths, according to a new report.

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Increasing salt intake tied to diabetes risk

High levels of salt consumption may increase an adult's risk of developing diabetes, researchers say.

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Nerve 'zap' treatment could be alternative to CPAP for sleep apnea

People with more serious cases of sleep apnea may get lasting relief from an implanted nerve stimulator, a new study finds.

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Widening waistlines may raise women's cancer risk

Excess belly fat increases older women's risk of some cancers, new research suggests.

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Take a stand against sitting too much

Days spent sitting for hours may increase your risk for an early death no matter how much you exercise, researchers say.

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Guinea pigs harbor a hidden health hazard

Been looking for a reason to turn down your child's pleas for a pet Guinea pig? Dutch researchers say the rodents may carry germs tied to serious pneumonia.

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'Cancer pen' could help surgeons spot tumor cells in seconds

A new "cancer pen" promises to help surgeons immediately detect and completely remove cancerous tumor tissue, without having to send samples off to a lab for testing while the patient languishes on the table.

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Could the Zika virus help battle a deadly brain cancer?

The Zika virus is well known for causing devastating brain defects in fetuses. But what if scientists could use that ability to do something good?

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Is dementia declining among older Americans?

Here's some good news for America's seniors: The rates of Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia have dropped significantly over the last decade or so, a new study shows.

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Take the back pain out of backpacks

Backpacks can mean backaches for schoolchildren, but an orthopedic surgeon has advice for parents and kids about how to keep soreness at bay.

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E-cigs may help smokers quit, but...

E-cigarettes can help smokers quit, but only if they discard tobacco in favor of vaping nearly every day, a new study suggests.

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The Healthinista set for the Women's Health Conference

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CARTERVILLE -- The 31st annual Southern Illinois Women's Health Conference returns later this month.

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Sleepless nights do no favors for your heart

Poor sleep won't simply leave you bleary-eyed. It's also linked with stroke and reduced blood supply to the heart, a new study suggests.

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As temperatures fall, heart attacks may rise

If the cold weather makes you shiver, your blood vessels and heart may be quivering, too -- and that may be enough to trigger a heart attack in some people, new research suggests.

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Undiagnosed heart condition 'AFib' may be common, study suggests

Many people at risk for atrial fibrillation probably do have the irregular heart rhythm but have not been diagnosed, a new study reports.

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How to fight fall allergies

People who suffer from allergies may start sneezing and wheezing in the fall, but there are things they can do to ease their seasonal misery.

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A shot of caffeine may speed wake-up after anesthesia

Caffeine may help patients wake up more quickly after general anesthesia, an animal study suggests.

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Skeletons give clues to Americans' rising arthritis rates

Rates of knee osteoarthritis have doubled in the United States since the 1940s, but it's not just because Americans are living longer and weigh more, a new study suggests.

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Kidney disease may boost risk of abnormal heartbeat

People with failing kidneys are at increased risk of developing a life-threatening abnormal heart rhythm, a new report suggests.

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Deaths from colon cancer up among younger white Americans

Colon cancer is claiming the lives of more younger, white Americans, a troubling new report shows.

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Can video game playing cost you gray matter?

A new study suggests -- but doesn't prove -- that certain players of action video games may lose gray matter in a part of the brain that's linked to mental illness.

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Eclipse Eye Safety

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WSIL-TV -- When viewing a solar eclipse you must keep safety first.  The American Astronomical Society offers the following advise for viewing a solar eclipse: The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the Sun. 

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What diabetics need to know about over-the-counter meds

It can be tough for people with diabetes to choose appropriate over-the-counter medicines for a cold, cough or headache, a pharmacist explains.

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Generic eye drops for seniors could save millions of dollars a year

Prescribing generic drugs for seniors' eye problems could save the U.S. government hundreds of millions of dollars a year, a new study suggests.

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Treatment costs can be another blow to cancer patients

The emotional and physical costs of cancer can be staggering. But the financial side of cancer is also a great burden, with many patients in the United States struggling to pay for treatment, new research reveals.

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Noninvasive brain test may pinpoint type of dementia

Distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from another common form of dementia may get easier using a new, noninvasive technique, researchers say.

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Even a one-minute run might help a woman's bones

Just a minute or two of running every day could strengthen your bones, new research suggests.

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Here's why a soda with that burger is especially fattening

Combining a sugary soda with your burger or fried chicken can really prime your body to pack on more pounds, a new study suggests.

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Healthy heart in 20s, better brain in 40s?

Folks with heart-healthy habits in their 20s tend to have larger, healthier brains in their 40s -- brains that may be better prepared to withstand the ravages of aging, a new study reports.

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Create your own quit-smoking plan

Smokers who quit before their 50th birthday can cut in half their risk of dying over the following 15 years, according to the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston

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Not all plant foods are equal

For years, the mantra has been that eating lots of fruits, vegetables and grains will ward off heart disease, but a new study suggests that choosing the wrong ones may backfire.

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Sound sleep may help you junk the junk food

Get a good night's sleep and junk food may have less appeal at the end of a tough day.

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One social hour a week can help someone with dementia

Just a slight increase in social interaction benefits older adults with dementia and lowers health care costs, a new British study suggests.

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Viagra might make for a safer, more effective stent

It's worked wonders for men battling erectile dysfunction, and now early research suggests that Viagra -- when added to artery-opening stents -- might cut a patient's odds for clots.

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Keep your summer cookouts safe

Backyard barbecues are a seasonal staple, but summer heat makes it extra important to keep food safety in mind.

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Is shingles tied to heart, stroke risk?

Shingles may be tied to an increased risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

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Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

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Heat deaths in U.S. cities could jump 10-fold if climate change isn't slowed

America's exit from the Paris climate change agreement will lead to more punishing summer heat waves and thousands of additional heat-related deaths each year in major U.S. cities, a new report claims.

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Health tip: when adults offer kids food

Well-meaning family and friends may push your children to clean the plate or offer dessert as a reward, but those aren't the messages you want to send.

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Bye-bye flu shot, hello patch?

An experimental flu vaccine patch with dissolving microneedles appears safe and effective, a preliminary study shows.

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Could shift work damage your DNA?

When people work the night shift, their bodies might have less capacity to repair everyday damage to cells' DNA, a small study hints.

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Boozing can age you right down to your cells

The more you booze it up, the more your cells age, increasing your risk for age-related health problems like heart disease, diabetes, cancer and dementia, a new study suggests.

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Can smartphone use bring on carpal tunnel syndrome?

People who spend lots of time on their smartphones may be scrolling, tapping and swiping their way to carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful wrist and hand disorder.

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Could you raise a 'no-diaper' baby?

Environmentally conscious parents have long struggled with the fact that their baby's dirty diapers wind up in landfills, but what option do they have?

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Do older dads produce brainy boys?

In a finding that might bring older Dads some peace of mind about their sons' future job prospects, a new study shows these kids are more likely to be "geeks."

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Could certain hair dyes, relaxers raise breast cancer risk?

The safety of hair products has been debated for years. Now, new research suggests that black women who use dark hair dyes face a higher risk of breast cancer, while chemical relaxers and straighteners boost the odds in white women

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High-intensity exercise may be bad for the bowels

When it comes to stomach discomfort during exercise, forget that old adage "no pain, no gain." New research suggests that excessive strenuous exercise may lead to gut damage.

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Can coffee, tea protect the liver from 'western' diet?

Regularly drinking coffee or herbal tea may help prevent chronic liver disease, new research suggests.

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Flu shot falls short more often for obese people: study

A flu shot is the best way to avoid getting sick, but new research reveals the vaccine doesn't work as well for people who are obese.

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New drugs show promise as first to prevent migraine

A host of new drugs that appear to prevent migraine headaches are in the final stages of testing and approval in the United States.

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Guard against this little-known swimming danger

An electric shock is an often overlooked threat to swimmers, a safety expert warns.

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Even moderate drinking may dull the aging brain

People who drink at even moderate levels may see some of their mental skills slip faster as they age, a new study suggests.

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Is white bread ok for some people?

For years, you probably have been told that wheat bread is far better for you than its white counterpart, but a small, new study suggests that maxim may not hold true for everyone.

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When a divorce turns bitter, kids' immune systems may pay a price

An unfriendly divorce can raise a child's risk of colds in adulthood, a new study suggests.

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Drug helps fight breast tumors tied to 'cancer genes'

A twice-daily pill could help some advanced breast cancer patients avoid or delay follow-up sessions of chemotherapy, a new clinical trial reports.

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Marijuana may make your gums go to pot

Frequent pot smokers might be dooming themselves to diseased gums, a new study suggests.

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Drug Xeloda prolongs survival for some breast cancer patients

A drug called Xeloda can extend the lives of some women whose breast cancer is not wiped out by standard treatment, a new clinical trial finds.

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Meth addicts' hearts may improve if they quit

Methamphetamine users who quit the drug may get a break: New research suggests it's possible to reverse heart damage with proper medical treatment.

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Eye problems may be tied to Zika, lab study suggests

Scientists exploring how the Zika virus passes from pregnant monkeys to their fetuses believe the infection may be more dangerous to human pregnancies than previously believed.

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5 food groups to jump-start nutrition

Most Americans still don't eat enough nutrient-rich foods from key groups including vegetables, fruits, whole grains and low-fat dairy, according to federal health statistics.

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Hospital 'baby boxes' may help prevent SIDS in newborns

Child care experts say it's dangerous for infants to sleep in the same bed with their parents. Now, researchers report that "baby boxes" and parent education can help reduce the unsafe practice.

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Jeep Jam returns for Hospice of Southern Illinois

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WSIL -- Hospice of Southern Illinois is hitting the road for its latest fundraiser. The second annual Jeep Jam Poker run is Saturday, June 17.  

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Program that grants kids' wishes looking for volunteers

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EVANSVILLE, IN -- You've probably heard of the Make-a-Wish Foundation. But there is a more localized group granting wishes for hundreds of children around the region.  

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Alabama boy reacts to seeing new eye

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ALABAMA -- An Alabama boy battling a form of eye cancer recently received a prosthetic eye, and his parents caught his reaction on camera. 

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Color Fun Run benefits Autism Society of SI

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CARBONDALE -- Mark your calendars for April 15. No your taxes aren't due that day that's April 18 this year. It's the Autism Society of Southern Illinois' Color Fun Run.     

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Wear purple to support pancreatic cancer awareness

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WSIL -- November 17 is World Pancreatic Cancer Day.

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Injectors to fight allergic reactions under Rauner's review

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CHICAGO (AP) - A bill is awaiting action from Gov. Bruce Rauner that would give Illinois police training and authorization to carry epinephrine auto-injectors to help with severe allergic reactions.

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Data: Many Illinois schools cut back on physical education

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CHICAGO (AP) - Data released by the Illinois State Board of Education show many schools in the state have cut back on days of physical education on class schedules.

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Food for Thought: Serving up pie for Thanksgiving

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WSIL -- Thanksgiving is around the corner and one of the favorite parts of the meal is dessert.  

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Double-digit leaps in insurance prices in parts of Illinois

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CHICAGO (AP) - Insurance prices in parts of Illinois are spiking by more than 20 percent on the marketplace that's a cornerstone of President Barack Obama's health overhaul. More>>

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