Health - WSIL-TV 3 Southern Illinois

Del Monte recalls more than 60,000 cases of canned corn

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WSIL -- Del Monte Foods Inc. is recalling more than 60,000 cases of canned FIESTA CORN seasoned with Red & Green Peppers due to under-processing. 

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5.1 million pounds of beef added to recall due to salmonella

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WASHINGTON -- JBS Tolleson, Inc., is recalling an additional 5 million pounds of raw beef, sold under several brands including the Kroger brand because it could be contaminated with Salmonella Newport.

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Tampons recalled because they were unraveling inside people's bodies

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WSIL -- Kimberly-Clark is recalling some U by Kotex Sleek Tampons because they can unravel inside women, causing infections and injury.

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Jimmy Dean sausage recalled due to possible metal pieces

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WSIL -- CTI Foods LLC, based in Owingsville, Kentucky, is recalling approximately 30 thousand pounds of frozen, ready-to-eat pork and poultry sausage links because they could have metal in them.

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Sleep, don't cram, before finals for better grades

It's a college tradition to pull "all-nighters" during final exams. But students may get better grades if they simply go to bed early, two new studies suggest.

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Sporting events dangerous for spectators, too

Serious sports injuries aren't confined to athletes -- spectators also run that risk, a new study finds.

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Officials warn of behavioral health care worker shortage Video included

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CHICAGO -- Mental health advocates plead with lawmakers to increase funding for behavioral healthcare workers.

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More are seeking mental health care, but not always those who need it most

A new report shows the rate of people with serious psychological distress is declining, and more folks are seeking mental health care on an outpatient basis

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More blood pressure meds recalled due to carcinogen

Over the past few months, numerous recalls of the popular heart drug valsartan have already occurred. Now, generics maker Mylan Pharmaceuticals is adding more products to the list.

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'I Lost a Child' ceremony allows parents to grieve Video included

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CARBONDALE, Ill. -- It's never easy to deal with a loss of a loved one. But the holiday season can be even more emotional.  

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Dealing with substance abuse issues during the holidays Video included

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CARBONDALE, Ill. -- The holidays are typically a time for happy family gatherings but it could be difficult for people dealing with substance abuse issues.

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FDA approves drug for dogs scared by noise

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WSIL -- Does your dog show signs of distress around loud noises?

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Nine more people fall ill due to E. coli linked to romaine lettuce

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WSIL -- Nine more people have been reported ill in the E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) last update on November 26.

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Man says he urinated on Kellogg's cereal conveyor belt

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) -- A Tennessee man faces up to three years in prison for urinating on a Kellogg's cereal conveyor belt at a Memphis facility.

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Drug halves tumor recurrence for women with a common breast cancer

For certain women with early stage breast cancer, a newer drug that combines an antibody with chemotherapy may cut the risk of disease recurrence in half, a new trial finds.

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Mental health and college students

There's an adjustment period for almost every new college student -- but there are some signs that suggest your young person needs more serious help than a care package from home

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High cost has over 1 in 4 diabetics cutting back on insulin

More than one-quarter of people with diabetes have skimped on needed insulin because of the drug's soaring price tag, according to a new small study.

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Stimulating one brain area may ease tough-to-treat depression

Electrical stimulation of a certain part of the brain may offer a new option for "treatment-resistant" depression, a small new study suggests.

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Prolonged brain connections seen in adults with autism

Connections between different areas of the brain are sustained longer than usual in people with autism, perhaps explaining some of their symptoms, a new study suggests.

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What's best for babies with recurring ear infections

Infant ear infections can be a source of frustration for parents and babies alike. But there are steps to lessen them and, when they do occur, "less is more" is a better way to treat them.

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Finding the right number of 'reps' when strength training

When you first start strength training, almost any weight you lift will bring some results.

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Key strategies when caring for a loved one with dementia

People caring for a loved one with Alzheimer's or other types of dementia should focus on four main safety issues, an expert says.

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5 ways to get more whole grains into your diet

Making the switch to whole wheat bread and whole wheat pasta are good ways to get more unrefined grains (and needed fiber) into your diet.

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Under new plan, FDA hopes to cut use of dogs in veterinary drug trials

As part of a new effort to cut the use of dogs in drug trials, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday launched an initiative to keep canines out of studies for certain veterinary medicines.

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Many infants with milk allergy seem to outgrow it

Milk allergy affects more than half of American infants who have food allergies in their first year of life, a new study finds.

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House Call: Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Video included

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WSIL -- November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month. Right now, the five-year survival rate is just 9 percent which is one of the lowest among major types of cancer.  

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Ageism costs billions in health care dollars

Prejudice directed at older people results in $63 billion in excess health costs each year in the United States, a new study claims.

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You may be prediabetic and don't know it, CDC warns

More than one-third of Americans have prediabetes, but 90 percent of them don't know they have it, medical experts say.

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Concussion tied to suicide risk

People who have experienced either a concussion or a mild traumatic brain injury are twice as likely to commit suicide than others, a new review suggests.

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A single energy drink might harm blood vessels: study

Caffeine-laden energy drinks are popular, but they might make your blood vessels less efficient, a small study suggests.

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Obesity may harm kids' academics, coping skills

Obese kids may have extra difficulty with schoolwork and coping under stress, a preliminary study suggests.

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Antibiotics during infancy may up childhood obesity risk

Babies who are prescribed antibiotics before they're 2 years old may be more likely to become obese children, new research suggests.

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Could diabetes drugs help curb Alzheimer's?

Alzheimer's patients taking diabetes drugs may have fewer signs of dementia in their brains than similar patients not taking the drugs, new research finds.

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Stigma of autism can take toll on psyche

Social stigma may play a large role in the depression, anxiety and other mental health woes experienced by many people with autism, a small new study indicates.

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Michael Phelps champions the fight against depression

Swimmer extraordinaire Michael Phelps has won 28 Olympic medals -- 23 of them gold. Yet, despite all those medals and the accolades that came with them, Phelps has struggled with depression and anxiety.

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Common chemical tied to language delay in kids

Children may suffer delayed language skills if their mothers come in contact with common chemicals called phthalates in early pregnancy, new research suggests.

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Medical bills 'toxic' for some breast cancer patients

Many women living with advanced breast cancer face significant financial strains -- from paying for their care to simply covering monthly bills, a new survey finds.

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House Call: Advice on prescription drug management

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WSIL -- When it comes to medication, it's important patients know exactly what they're taking. 

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New research offers insights into football-related concussions

Repeated hits to the head, rather than one severe blow, may determine whether football players suffer a concussion, a new study suggests.

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Santa Speedo 5K to raise money on World AIDS Day

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CARBONDALE, Ill. -- A revealing 5K fundraiser event is coming to our region in December. It's called the Santa Speedo 5K run/walk.  

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Gene therapy for Parkinson's symptoms shows promise

A new gene therapy might help improve motor symptoms in people with Parkinson's disease who aren't responding to other therapies, an early study has found.

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'Stress hormone' tied to worse memory in middle age

Middle-aged people with higher-than-average levels of the "stress" hormone cortisol may have fuzzier memories, a new study suggests.

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Are generics as good as brand-name drugs?

Generics make up 80 percent of drug prescriptions filled in the United States and are a big cost savings for consumers.

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Love organic foods? Your odds for some cancers may fall

Paying extra for those pricey organic fruits and vegetables might pay off: New research suggests eating them might help you dodge a cancer diagnosis.

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Hospital bed sheets still germy despite washing

Even after a thorough cleaning, traces of diarrhea-causing bacteria can remain on hospital bed sheets, researchers report.

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House Call: Meat allergy caused by tick bites

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WSIL -- Tick bites can cause a lot of health problems. One that is seemingly on the rise meat allergies.  

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Don't want rosacea? Drinking coffee might help

Contrary to popular belief, new research suggests that drinking coffee might be a good prescription for avoiding the unsightly skin condition known as rosacea.

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ER nurses might do better 'eyeballing' patients

"Eyeballing" emergency room patients may be better than a formal medical assessment in identifying those most in need of urgent care, a new study suggests.

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Obesity surgery may cut heart attack risk in diabetics

Obesity surgery may help prevent heart attacks and strokes in people who are severely overweight and have diabetes, a new large study suggests.

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White House wants prices in drug ads, but big pharma fights back

In an attempt to head off federal regulation, America's pharmaceutical manufacturers announced Monday that they would take voluntary action to make drug prices more transparent.

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Facebook posts may hint at depression

People may rely on social media such as Facebook to showcase the highlights of their lives, like vacations. But new research suggests the language they use in posts might also help predict depression.

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Add asthma to list of possible causes of childhood obesity

Children with asthma are at increased risk for childhood obesity, a new study suggests.

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House Call: Breast cancer screening guidelines

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CARBONDALE -- October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. This week in our House Call segment, we're chatting with Dr. Arsalan Salamat.   

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Bug behind stomach cancer also linked to colon cancer

The same type of bacteria that causes stomach cancer may also increase colon cancer risk, especially in black Americans, a new study finds.

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Quitting junk food causes withdrawals

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HEALTHLINE -- We all have some guilty-pleasure junk foods: French fries, pizza, sweets. Sometimes, it can be hard to cut these unhealthy treats.

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Don't overlook heart care after cancer diagnosis

Patients with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation are less likely to see a cardiologist or fill prescriptions for blood-thinning drugs if they've had cancer, a new study finds.

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Skip the cold meds for kids under 6, experts say

School is in full swing, and with it comes a plethora of colds passed back and forth among kids.

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Can intermittent fasting help reverse type 2 diabetes?

Occasional fasting may help control type 2 diabetes, a small Canadian study suggests.

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Seniors, take steps to reduce your risk of falling

One in four Americans 65 and older falls each year, with some ending up in hospitals or even dying. But new research suggests that it's possible to avoid some of these serious injuries.

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Does aspirin help prevent liver cancer?

Take two aspirins and reduce your risk of liver cancer? New research suggests this weekly routine might help.

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Drowsy driving as risky as drunk driving

Getting too little sleep at night? If so, your odds for a car crash are rising, new research suggests.

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How much he sleeps may affect his stroke risk

Getting too little or too much sleep can affect stroke risk, depending on a man's race, researchers say.

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Acne's stigma can take a big mental toll

The impact of acne is more than skin-deep, and often disrupts sleep and well-being, scientists have found.

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Therapeutic vaccine shows promise against a range of cancers

A personalized vaccine held an aggressive group of cancers in check among more than half of patients who received it in a small, preliminary trial, researchers report.

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One football rule change might lower concussion risk

The most dangerous play in football can be rendered safer through a simple rule change, a new study out of the Ivy League suggests.

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Common diabetes meds may raise odds for amputation

People with type 2 diabetes who are taking common drugs called diuretics may be at a significantly increased risk of losing a foot or leg, according to a new French study.

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Will a defibrillator 'vest' protect recent heart attack patients?

Wearable defibrillators do not lower the chances of dying from sudden cardiac arrest among high-risk patients who've just had a heart attack, a new investigation concludes.

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Doctors use bacteria as weapon against cancer

It's a perfect case of the enemy of my enemy is my friend.

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House Call: Genetic testing for breast cancer

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WSIL -- October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Genetic testing is often done to determine a person's risk of developing the disease.  

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Are household chemicals harming your cat's thyroid?

Maybe your cat is scratching up that sofa for a good reason: New research suggests that chemicals found in upholstery and carpeting may harm feline thyroids.

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Don't turn a blind eye to vision problems

Your eyes are subject to a wide variety of health conditions, from minor annoyances to serious chronic diseases and even cancer.

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Antibiotics may cure appendicitis -- no operation needed

If you're suffering from acute appendicitis, you might be successfully treated with antibiotics and never need an operation to remove your appendix, Finnish researchers report.

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Scientists developing blood test for drowsy driving

Here's a welcome alert: Scientists say they're inching closer to a blood test for drowsy driving.

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Spinal implant could be breakthrough for paralyzed patients

A paraplegic man has regained the ability to move his legs and walk with assistance, thanks to an implanted electrode stimulating his spinal cord, Mayo Clinic researchers say.

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More needs to be done to keep teen drivers safe, pediatricians say

Following years of decline, fatal car accidents involving teen drivers have accelerated in the United States, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians warns.

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FDA issues warning on pet reactions to common flea medicine

Flea medicines protect your pet, but some animals can have serious side effects from products containing isoxazoline, U.S. health officials warn.

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Regular bedtime might be key to better health

As important as getting close to eight hours of sleep a night is, new research suggests that going to bed and waking up at the same time every day is just as critical for your health.

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Obesity Prevention and Diabetes Awareness Walk coming soon

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WSIL -- Two-thirds of the adults in this country are considered obese by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

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5 facts every woman should know about ovarian cancer

The early symptoms of ovarian cancer are often confused with less serious issues, making successful treatment less likely, a cancer expert warns.

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30 million Americans now have diabetes

1 in 7 Americans has diabetes, and many don't even know they have the blood sugar disease, a new report shows.

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Two walks planned to raise awareness about Alzheimer's Video included

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WSIL -- The Alzheimer's Association has planned a pair of walks to raise awareness about the disease.

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Parents blame smartphones, tablets for teens' sleep troubles

Many American teens are sleep-deprived, and parents blame their attachment to electronics, new survey results show.

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Coffee may have another perk for kidney patients

Could that morning cup of joe bring a health boost to people battling kidney disease?

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Is daily low-dose aspirin really worth it for seniors?

Hemera / Thinkstock Hemera / Thinkstock

There's disappointing news for seniors: A new trial shows that taking daily low-dose aspirin doesn't prolong healthy, independent living in otherwise healthy people aged 70 and older.

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Cancer advances rely on U.S. funding: report

Almost two dozen new cancer treatments received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval in the past year, a new report reveals.

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Could a placebo pill help ease your back pain?

With millions of pain-plagued Americans looking for an alternative to opioids, the solution for some might be no medicine at all.

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Timing may be critical when taking meds

When you take your medications may have a lot to do with how well they work, new research suggests.

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Going vegetarian to cut colon cancer risk

There's no disputing the fact that regular colonoscopies, now suggested to start at age 45 for those with an average risk of colorectal cancer, can help prevent the disease by finding -- and removing -- precancerous growths

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Acne advice for returning students

As if the start of a new school year isn't stressful enough, many teens may find their acne worsens when classes start, a skin doctor says.

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Want to avoid type 2 diabetes? Eat more whole grains

It may seem counterintuitive, but eating bread, pasta and cereal may actually help prevent type 2 diabetes, as long as those foods are made from whole grains, new research suggests.

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4 habits that lead to better food choices

The choices you make every day, both big and small, influence your weight and your health.

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New drug of last resort tackles resistant HIV

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is typically a manageable infection, but medications that keep the virus at bay don't work for everyone. Now, researchers have developed a new medication to help them.

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Walking, exercise both linked to lower heart failure in older women

The more a middle-aged or elderly woman walks, the less likely she is to have heart failure, a large new study reveals.

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New one-dose flu drug shows promise

An experimental single-dose flu drug shows promise as a new way to alleviate the misery of influenza, researchers say.

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Fish oil pills during pregnancy might mean stronger, healthier kids

Taking fish oil supplements during pregnancy might translate into healthier growth in children during their first six years of life, a new study suggests.

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New hormonal link suspected in type 2 diabetes

Two disorders that often occur together -- type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure -- may have a common link in a hormone called aldosterone, researchers suggest.

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Chemo for lung cancer may trigger early menopause, study finds

Younger women who undergo chemotherapy for lung cancer are more likely to experience early menopause, researchers have found.

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Taming those high-calorie temptations

It's the dieter's tug-of-war: the need to lose weight versus the urge to eat high-calorie foods.

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FDA warns of dangers of liquid nitrogen in food, drinks

iStockphoto / Peter Nadoiski iStockphoto / Peter Nadoiski

You risk serious injury if you consume or handle food and drink products where liquid nitrogen is added just before consumption, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Friday.

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ADHD rates rising sharply in u.s. kids

iStockphoto / Isabel Masse iStockphoto / Isabel Masse

The number of ADHD diagnoses among children has risen dramatically in the past two decades, going from 6 percent to 10 percent, a new report shows.

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