Health - WSIL-TV 3 Southern Illinois

Marriage is good medicine for the heart

Add protection from heart disease and stroke to the health benefits of marriage, a new study suggests.

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Severe stress may send immune system into overdrive

Trauma or intense stress may up your odds of developing an autoimmune disease, a new study suggests.

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One blood test might be enough to diagnose diabetes

New research suggests that a single blood test could confirm type 2 diabetes, saving patients time and health care costs.

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Staying safe in the extreme heat

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MURPHYSBORO, Ill. -- After more than 20 years in landscaping, Kyle Needham knows what its like to experience heat exhaustion.

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Pediatricians say no to spanking

Most U.S. pediatricians say spanking is a bad way to discipline children.

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House Call: New recommendations for breast cancer treatment Video included

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WSIL -- New findings from the groundbreaking Trial Assigning Individualized Options for Treatment (Rx), or TAILORx trial, show no benefit from chemotherapy for 70 percent of women with the most common type of breast cancer.  

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Strategies to avoid sunburn

If you could protect yourself from cancer, you'd do it, right?

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Liver cancer a growing health concern

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HealthDay News -- Liver cancer cases in several developed countries have doubled in the past 25 years, due to the continuing obesity epidemic and a spike in hepatitis infections, new research suggests. 

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Del Monte recalls veggie trays

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WSIL -- Del Monte is recalling fresh-cut vegetable trays sold in six states including Illinois because they are the suspected to be the source of a parasite that has sickened at least 78 people.

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Sleepless nights haunt 1 in 4 Americans

Good sleep is hard to come by for the 25 percent of Americans who experience a period of severe insomnia each year, new research suggests.

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Who will and who won't get the flu?

Doctors can't yet predict if someone exposed to the flu will become sick. But such predictions may be getting closer to reality, new research hints.

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Kellogg's recalling Honey Smacks due to possible salmonella

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WSIL -- Kellogg Company is recalling Honey Smacks cereal because it may contain salmonella. 

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Surgical blood transfusions tied to clot risk

Blood transfusions around the time of surgery may raise your risk for dangerous blood clots, researchers say.

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Free medical, dental and vision screenings in Saline Co. Video included

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HARRISBURG -- The Defense Department, Delta Leadership Authority and the Egyptian Health Department are teaming up for free screenings for people in our region.  

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U.S. obesity rates rising again

After briefly leveling off, the U.S. obesity rate may be climbing again, according to a preliminary study.

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New DNA test may predict prostate cancer risk

A new genetic test can identify men most likely to develop prostate cancer, a new report contends.

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Dogs may help soothe vets with PTSD

Service dogs may help reduce levels of the stress hormone cortisol in military veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new study finds.

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Baby teeth could be predictor of autism: study

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NEW YORK -- A recent examination of baby teeth may have helped scientists identity a cause of autism, according to a new report.

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Coffee may do your liver good

More good news for coffee lovers: Having three or more cups of "joe" each day may help ward off serious liver ailments, new research suggests.

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Mother warns of tick dangers after daughter paralyzed

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WSIL -- A mom in Mississippi says she got the scare of her life when her young daughter temporarily lost the ability to walk after getting bitten by a tick. 

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How to determine your health insurance's true costs

Having health insurance is essential, especially for catastrophic situations. But it's important to choose a plan carefully because your costs can go well beyond the monthly premium

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House Call: Kidney stone risk factors Video included

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WSIL -- Kidney stones are a painful condition. They can happen any time of year, but in the summer months, the risks seems to increase. 

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Allergies more common in kids with Autism

Children with autism are more likely to also have a food, respiratory or skin allergy, new research suggests.

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Herbal medicine workshop coming to Union County Video included

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ANNA -- Dayempur Herbals is hosting an herbal medicine workshop later this month.  

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Free dental program to benefit area children

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WSIL -- The SIU Dental Sealant Grant Program is providing free preventative dental services to kids in our region this summer. 

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Salmonella outbreak in Midwest linked to pre-cut melons

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WSIL -- A warning about a salmonella outbreak that's apparently linked to pre-cut melons that were sold at Walmart and other stores in the Midwest. 

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The keto diet is popular, but is it safe?

Fatty cuts of meat. Thick slabs of cheese. Stacks of bacon.

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Why NFL teams play better at night

If your favorite National Football League team has a make-or-break game this coming season, you might want to hope for a nighttime kickoff.

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Go vegan to jumpstart weight loss

Vegan diets are hard for many people to stick with long-term, but studies show that this way of eating can translate to weight loss.

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Heart meds may be wrong for millions of Americans

Millions of Americans may be getting the wrong treatment to prevent a heart attack or stroke, a new study suggests.

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Could a blood test spot lung cancer early?

Genetic blood testing is showing potential as a means of catching some early stage cancers, researchers are reporting.

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House Call: Bariatric surgery coming to Marion Video included

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MARION -- CrossRoads Hospital in Mt. Vernon is working with doctors at Heartland Regional Medical Center in Marion to offer bariatric surgery.

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Cancer care twice as costly in U.S. versus Canada

What a difference a border makes, when it comes to the cost of cancer care.

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Many poor women miss out on folic acid supplements during pregnancy

Even though folic acid supplements are known to lower the risk of birth defects, poorer women rarely take them before or during pregnancy, a new study shows.

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New guidelines lower colon cancer screening age to 45

Most people should now begin colorectal cancer screening at age 45, say new guidelines that were spurred by the rising rate of the disease among younger Americans.

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How much exercise helps the aging brain?

It's well-known that exercise benefits the brain as well as the heart and muscles, but new research pinpoints just how much -- and what types -- of exercise may promote thinking skills as you age.

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The ER or urgent care?

Urgent care centers are popping up across the country as an option for medical treatment. But it's important to know the differences between these facilities and your local hospital emergency department.

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Are yawns really contagious?

We've all "caught" yawning from other people, but why that happens is unclear, according to a psychologist who has researched the behavior.

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To repel ticks this summer, try insecticide-treated clothes

Outdoor enthusiasts: Here's a bit of good tick-fighting news just in time for Memorial Day weekend and the unofficial start of summer.

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A germ-filled capsule might help spot gastro ills

Someday doctors may be able to diagnose gastrointestinal (GI) problems without invasive tests by asking patients to swallow a capsule containing a small, bacteria-laced sensor.

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Another foe for the U.S. military: skin cancer

For U.S. military personnel, deployment carries many dangers. And besides the well-known threats they face, these men and women are also at a higher-than-average risk for skin cancer

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New guidelines mean 1 in 3 adults may need blood pressure meds

One out of every three U.S. adults has high blood pressure that should be treated with medication, under guidelines recently adopted by the two leading heart health associations.

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Yoga may be right move against urinary incontinence

Yoga can help older women who fight frequent bouts of urinary incontinence, new research suggests.

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Toxins in BBQ fumes may be absorbed through the skin

When you fire up the grill for your Memorial Day cookout, beware: Those tantalizing aromas hold an underestimated health risk.

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A pill to protect you from the sun? Don't believe it, FDA says

If you think popping a pill will somehow keep your skin safe while you tan, think again.

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Screening may miss signs of autism, especially in girls: study

An important checklist used to screen for autism can miss subtle clues in some children, delaying their eventual diagnosis.

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Chiropractic has role to play in easing lower back pain: study

Chiropractic care can help ease low back pain when added to a comprehensive treatment plan, a new clinical trial has found.

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Tasty, healthy alternatives to sandwich bread

Sandwiches make convenient lunches, but those two slices of bread can really eat into your day's calorie allotment. What's more, typical white bread doesn't provide much in the way of nutrients.

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House Call: Orthopaedic Institute of Southern Illinois

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HERRIN -- As temperatures warm up, more people will be out and about and that increases the chance for injuries.  

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FDA approves first drug aimed at preventing migraines

The millions of Americans who suffer from migraine may have a new source of hope -- the first drug aimed at preventing the headaches gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval on Thursday.

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Pools, hot tubs can harbor dangerous germs

Pools, hot tubs and water playgrounds may be synonymous with summertime fun, but they also can be breeding grounds for dangerous germs that could make you violently ill.

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Eat fish twice a week to ward off heart disease, experts say

There is more reason than ever for people to make fish a bigger part of their diets, according to the American Heart Association.

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The truth about juicing

Between juice bars and high-powered home juicing machines, drinking your fruits and veggies has certainly gone mainstream.

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Scientists are targeting the common cold

British researchers have developed a molecule they claim could make colds a thing of the past.

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What causes cancer? Misconceptions abound

Many people are clueless about what can actually cause cancer, a new study finds.

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7 mistakes that can boost your blood pressure reading

Mum's the word the next time you have your blood pressure checked.

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Sun's UV rays a threat to your eyes, too

It's not just your skin that needs protection from ultraviolet rays, health experts warn.

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Depression may dampen memory

Depression may do more than darken your mood, with new research suggesting it might also sap your memory.

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Many parents miss speech disorders in young kids

Many parents don't recognize the signs of speech and language problems in children, or don't know that early treatment is important, a new survey finds.

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Non-opioids often underused after back surgery

Spine and joint surgery patients aren't taking advantage of common pain relievers like Tylenol or Motrin during their recovery, researchers say.

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PTSD may raise odds for irregular heartbeat

For reasons that aren't yet clear, people who battle PTSD may also be at heightened risk for the common heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation, researchers report.

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Expert panel highlights patient choice for prostate cancer screen

More men could receive PSA blood tests for prostate cancer under revised guidelines released Tuesday by the nation's leading panel on preventive medicine.

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Even mild concussion tied to greater dementia risk later

Concussions, even those that are mild, more than double the risk for developing dementia down the road, new research suggests.

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Drug duo approved for aggressive thyroid cancer

Two anti-cancer drugs administered together have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat an inherited form of thyroid cancer.

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Sleep-deprived kids at risk of obesity

Too little sleep can increase a child's risk of obesity, British researchers report.

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Scientists probe mystery of how hair prematurely goes gray

How does premature graying happen? Scientists say new animal research may help clear up the mystery.

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House Call: Children's Mental Health events coming this month

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HARRISBURG -- May 10 is Children's Mental Health Awareness Day. The Egyptian Health Department is marking the day with an event called Paint the Town Green.  

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The cold truth about migraine headaches

Early humans' ability to adapt to cold climates may have been helped by a genetic variant that's common in modern people who live in colder regions -- and is linked with migraine headaches, researchers say.

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Simple drug packaging change could save toddlers' lives

As America's opioid crisis continues, too many toddlers are accidentally overdosing on narcotic medicines. But a new study suggests that better packaging might curb the problem.

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Earlier mammograms may mean less need for aggressive treatments

Much of the debate over when to start having mammograms has focused on lives saved, but new research suggests that early screening might also translate into smaller tumors and less aggressive breast cancer treatments.

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Some reasons to work with a dietitian

Want customized diet advice to make your weight or health goals attainable? Consider working with an RD -- a registered dietitian.

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U.S. illnesses tied to ticks, mosquitoes are soaring

Diseases transmitted by biting insects -- ticks and mosquitoes in particular -- have more than tripled in the United States over the past decade, a new federal government report shows.

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Mid-life stresses may be tied to late-life dementia risk

Anxiety during middle age might signal impending dementia, a new analysis suggests.

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Get fit to cut your diabetes risk during pregnancy

If she's fit, a woman is less likely to develop diabetes during pregnancy, a new study contends.

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End-of-life care saves money

Giving very ill and dying patients palliative care shortens hospital stays and lowers costs, researchers report.

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Soda during pregnancy may not help baby's brain

Pregnant women may want to skip all soft drinks while they're expecting if they want their child's learning and memory skills to be sharper, new research suggests.

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A better clot-buster drug for strokes?

After a stroke, many patients are given the clot-busting intravenous drug alteplase, but another drug may be more effective, Australian researchers report.

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Hearing aids may help keep seniors out of the hospital

Hearing aids may mean fewer visits to the hospital for seniors, a new study suggests.

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More U.S. kids being diagnosed with autism

Autism rates continue to climb in the United States.

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House Call: CHESI services

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CAIRO -- Community Health and Emergency Services in Cairo is now managing two critical public health programs in the Southern 7 region.

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Health tip: recognize early signs of autism

Autism may be detected at an early age by paying attention to your baby's social and language skills, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.

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You and your pooch may have similar tummy bacteria

The makeup of bacteria in your dog's digestive tract may be more like your own than you think, researchers say.

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Americans toss out tons of fruits and veggies

Americans may be trying to eat healthy, but they're throwing away mountains of produce in the process, a new study suggests.

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'Flexitarian' eating: part vegetarian, part not

If you want to eat more vegetables and less meat, but don't want to give up meat altogether, there's an alternative.

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New drugs may be big advance in lung cancer care

Drugs designed to trigger a patient's immune system may help boost survival for those battling lung cancer, two new studies found.

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U.S. women less likely than men to get statins after heart attack

Women who survive a heart attack are less likely than men to receive cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that can reduce the risk of another heart attack or stroke, a new study finds.

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Another study finds later school bell brings sleep bonus for teens

Singapore's teens are the world's best on an international test of academic performance, but they pay for it with their sleep.

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Busting myths surrounding cancer and genetic testing

While only 5 percent to 10 percent of cancers are caused by an inherited gene mutation, genetic testing may benefit people with a strong history of family cancer, an expert in genetics suggests.

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Yoga can soothe anxious grade schoolers

Yoga at school might work wonders for the younger set, new research suggests.

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House Call: Walk to Cure Arthritis

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MARION -- The Walk to Cure Arthritis is coming up Saturday, April 21. Rent One Park in Marion is hosting the event this year. 

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Spring sneezin' season has sprung

If you suffer from allergies, you already know that pollen is in the air -- even in the parts of the United States with unseasonably cool temperatures. So what kind of allergy season can we expect this year?

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Aha: four-legged friends can have heart issues, too

Many Americans spend their lives with their pets -- sharing habits, walks and sometimes even the bed.

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FDA approves contact lenses that shade the sun

The lives of contact lens wearers just got a whole lot easier.

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The focus shifts in Alzheimer's research

The way that Alzheimer's disease is defined for research should be based on brain changes rather than symptoms.

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Why Americans' life expectancy is getting longer

Americans appear to be aging slower than they used to, which may help explain recent gains in life expectancy, researchers say.

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Sometimes, headaches can be an emergency. Here's when.

Sometimes, headaches can warn of a serious health issue. That's why it's important to know when to take action

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Stretching can help get seniors moving

Stretching leg muscles every day may benefit seniors and other people with mobility problems, a new study reports.

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'Magnetic pulse' device may be new way to prevent migraines

Self-administered magnetic pulses from a hand-held device may help head off debilitating migraines, researchers report.

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Those with diabetes less likely to see dentist despite health risks

Many adults with diabetes don't see the dentist often enough, even though they're at increased risk for gum disease, researchers say.

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Early promise for eye implant to fight macular degeneration

A new stem cell transplant might help preserve or even restore vision being lost to the dry form of age-related macular degeneration, a new pilot clinical trial has shown.

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Weightlifting injuries common for deployed U.S. troops

An "alarming" number of weightlifting injuries occur among U.S. military personnel in combat zones, according to a new study.

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Red meat tied to higher colon cancer risk for women

Another study, this time in British women, finds that diets high in red meat are linked to higher odds for colon cancer.

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Baby sitters, relatives often unaware of SIDS risk

A baby's risk of death from being placed in an unsafe sleeping position or location is higher when they're under the care of a baby sitter, relative or friend, a new study found.

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Abandoning your workouts may bring on the blues

Before you give up on your exercise program, know that new research suggests the decision may put more than your fitness at risk.

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Many grad students struggle with anxiety, depression

Depression and anxiety is nearly seven times more common among graduate students than in the general population, a new study finds.

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Many pick the wrong drugs for sneezin' season

Hay fever sufferers often choose the wrong medication for their seasonal sniffles, new research suggests.

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For hard-to-manage Type 1 Diabetes, transplant makes life better

New research shows that for people with type 1 diabetes who can no longer sense when their blood sugar levels drop too low, an islet cell transplant can dramatically improve their lives.

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Turn down the music. Here's why.

Parents annoyed by the loud music that their teens listen to might have good reason to worry.

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A 'chipped' tooth reveals what you eat and drink

Tempted to cheat on your diet? You might want to think twice.

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Could coffee perk up your heart health?

Besides staying alert, coffee lovers who drink more than three cups of java a day may lower their risk for clogged arteries, a new Brazilian study suggests.

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MRI sheds new light on brain networks tied to autism

New research suggests that a special MRI technique can spot abnormal connections in the brains of preschoolers with autism.

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Depression could be a risk factor for AFib: study

Depression can raise your risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm that's been linked to stroke and heart failure, a new study suggests.

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Tai chi beats aerobics for fibromyalgia pain

If you suffer from fibromyalgia, new research suggests tai chi might do more than aerobic exercise to ease your chronic pain.

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Study weighs heart danger of antibiotics for older women

New research finds that, for women over 60, there's a link between long-term use of antibiotics and heightened odds for heart-linked death.

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Well-done meat may not be good for your blood pressure

You might think twice about how you want that steak cooked.

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Sugary sodas linked again to increased heart risks

Would that ice cold soda be as tempting if you knew that it might shorten your life?

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Red and processed meats linked to liver woes

Bacon lovers, a new study has some bad news for you: Eating a lot of processed and red meats may up your odds for a serious liver condition and insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

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Women may dismiss subtle warning signs of heart disease

Warning signs of heart disease in women, such as fatigue, body aches and upset stomach, may be shrugged off as symptoms of stress or a hectic lifestyle.

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Diet groups can spell diet success

For some people, dieting is easier with emotional support.

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Male birth control pill shows early promise

An attempt to develop a safe and effective "male pill" is making headway, according to preliminary results of a small study.

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Can you be obese but heart-healthy? Study says no

A new British study of nearly 300,000 people dismantles the "obesity paradox," a theory that claims being obese does not necessarily raise heart risks.

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Binge drinking rampant among Americans

Americans are on a binge drinking binge.

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Health tip: recognize an anxiety disorder

Anxiety is a normal response to stress, but if it becomes overwhelming and difficult to conduct your daily routine, it may be time to seek help.

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Coffee may have bigger effect on your body than thought: study

Coffee has been tied to many health benefits. Now, a small study suggests a daily java habit may affect the body's metabolism more extensively than thought.

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Managing pain with fewer opioids after joint replacement

Using two or more pain control methods after hip and knee replacement surgery rather than opioid painkillers alone reduces risks to patients, a new study finds.

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Opioid ODs outpacing other 'deaths of despair'

Though fewer Americans are dying from alcohol abuse, suicide and murder, opioid overdose deaths have risen dramatically in recent decades, a new report finds.

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Three-in-one pill shows promise in beating high blood pressure

A pill that combines three blood pressure-lowering drugs improves people's chances of lowering their high blood pressure, researchers report.

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Fighting a cold or flu? Beware of overdosing on Tylenol

A brutal flu season has had people reaching for relief in their medicine cabinet, but a new study warns that overdosing on acetaminophen (Tylenol) is more common when bugs and viruses are circulating.

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1 in 20 younger women suffers major depression

Depression is a big problem in women during and after pregnancy, but it's also a concern throughout the reproductive years.

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Early colon cancer screening advised for some

From age 50 on, most people are advised to get a colonoscopy every 10 years to screen for colon cancer. But others may need to start screening earlier due to certain risk factors, an expert says.

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Sunnier days in youth may mean less odds of MS later

Living in sunnier climes when young might help shield you from multiple sclerosis decades later, new research suggests.

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Falls among elderly cost $50 billion annually

Falls by older Americans have devastating medical and economic consequences, reaching $50 billion a year, a new study finds.

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Blood pressure check? There may soon be an app for that

Someday soon, a simple touch of a finger to a smartphone case might be enough to provide instant, accurate blood pressure readings.

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Ban menthols to help some smokers quit

After the Canadian province of Ontario banned menthol cigarettes, many smokers responded by trying to kick the habit, a new study finds.

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New medication approved for drug-resistant HIV

Trogarzo (ibalizumab-uiyk) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat AIDS-causing HIV that has not responded to other antiretroviral medications.

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Primary care doctors loosen type 2 diabetes goals

The American College of Physicians (ACP) has issued new guidance on managing type 2 diabetes -- including relaxing the long-term blood sugar target called hemoglobin A1C.

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Many Americans think docs order too many tests, meds

Few older Americans believe ordering more tests and drugs is the way to better health care, a new survey finds.

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Don't count on healthy foods to blunt salt's harm

An otherwise healthy diet isn't going to offset damage to your heart from too much salt, a new study suggests.

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Nasty flu season shows more signs of slowing

The brutal flu season continues to ease its grip on the United States, with the latest government data showing that doctor visits are still dropping and less severe strains of the flu are starting to account for more...

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Helping your child navigate the high school years

High school is a major milestone in a teen's life.

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Big outdoor temperature swings tied to heart attack risk

Many people know that extreme cold can raise your chances of having a heart attack, but a new study suggests that wild swings in temperature may do the same.

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Why the flu makes you feel so miserable

If you're unlucky enough to come down with the flu, you can blame your own body for your fever, cough, muscle aches and head-to-toe distress, experts say.

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Toxic metals found in e-cigarette vapor

If you think that "vaping" is a safe alternative to smoking, new research suggests you might be inadvertently inhaling unsafe levels of toxic metals.

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Female hormones may play part in asthma

There may be a link between asthma in women and changes in levels of female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, researchers report.

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The sooner type 2 diabetes arrives, the worse for your heart

A type 2 diabetes diagnosis that comes early in life carries a deadly load of health risks, new research shows.

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For women, blocked arteries not the only trigger for heart attacks

Women don't need to have blocked arteries to experience a heart attack, a new study points out.

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Antidepressants do work, some better than others: study

Antidepressant drugs actually do help ease depression, countering debate over whether the medications do what they're supposed to, a large research review has found.

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New research debunks two medical marijuana myths

Mention legalizing medical marijuana, and people often think two things:

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Clues to Parkinson's may be shed in tears

Your tears may reveal if you are at risk of Parkinson's disease, preliminary research suggests.

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'Burnout' threatens more than a third of doctors

There's a good chance your doctor is in the middle of a quiet battle with professional burnout, a new study suggests.

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Aspirin as good a clot buster as pricey drugs after joint replacement

Good old aspirin is just as effective as newer, expensive drugs at preventing blood clots after hip or knee replacement, a new clinical trial suggests.

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Newer breast MRI may be more accurate and easier

A new type of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) that doesn't use a contrast agent appears better at detecting what's really cancer and what's likely just a harmless lesion, researchers report.

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Obesity might cause sudden cardiac arrest in the young

Obesity and high blood pressure may play a much greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among young people than previously thought, a new study suggests.

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Pets good medicine for those battling mental ills

Can the adoring gaze of a dog or the comforting purr of a cat be helpful to people with mental illness? Absolutely, new research suggests.

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Lung cancer one of many reasons not to smoke

You already know that smoking causes lung cancer. But tobacco use can lead to other major health problems, too, experts warn.

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It's not your imagination: you're hungrier after losing weight

If you find yourself famished after you've managed to diet away a sizable number of pounds, you're not alone.

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First blood test to evaluate potential concussions approved

The first blood test designed to help doctors evaluate whether a suspected brain injury is a concussion has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Another cancer vaccine shows promise in mice

In what researchers call a first step toward personalized vaccines for a multitude of cancers, a vaccine made from stem cells protected mice from tumors.

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FDA approves first blood test to detect concussions

The first blood test to help diagnose a concussion has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Obamacare helped more young women get prenatal care: study

One of the main features of Obamacare -- providing insurance for adults under age 26 through their parents' health plan -- allowed many pregnant young women to obtain prenatal care, new research shows.

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Preemies get a slow start on friendships

As if preemies didn't face enough struggles, a new study finds they have more difficulty making friends, though things improve once they start school.

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FDA says U.S. will now produce critical MRI component

A long-feared shortage of a substance used in millions of medical imaging procedures each year in the United States appears to have been avoided, federal officials report.

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Autism, bipolar and schizophrenia share genetic similarities

By examining brain tissue, researchers say they've found similarities in certain mental illnesses, including autism and schizophrenia.

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Fetal alcohol cases more common than thought: study

More U.S. children may be living with brain damage from prenatal drinking than experts have thought, a new study suggests.

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Crash diets might derail your heart health

Everyone wants a beach-ready body, and many are willing to starve themselves to achieve it quickly. But new research suggests that fat lost on crash diets may clog the heart and reduce its function.

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A hidden source of 'superbugs' in hospitals?

Hospital wastewater systems may play a role in antibiotic resistance, a new study suggests.

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Menopause may worsen rheumatoid arthritis symptoms

Menopause may speed physical decline in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a new study suggests.

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Exercise may help lung cancer surgery go more smoothly

Lung cancer patients can halve their risk of postop complications by taking up an exercise program before their surgery, a new report suggests.

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Weak vaccine making flu season even tougher, CDC says

This flu season continues to be one of the nastiest in years. And it isn't helping that the flu vaccine may be less than 20 percent effective against the season's dominant strain, according to a new Canadian report.

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Cow, soy or almond: which 'milk' is best for you?

Almond milk, soy milk, rice milk and coconut milk may all offer lactose-free alternatives to cow's milk, but new research suggests that the dairy version remains the most nutritious option.

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VA health system failing on mental health care: report

Many U.S. veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars aren't getting needed mental health treatment for conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression or substance abuse, a national panel of experts says.

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Procedure beats drugs for a-fib with heart failure

For people with both atrial fibrillation and heart failure, a procedure called ablation can be life-saving, a new clinical trial shows.

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Memory loss hitting some fentanyl abusers

Using fentanyl or other opioids alongside other illicit drugs could trigger possibly permanent amnesia caused by brain damage, doctors warn.

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Extra body fat may raise breast cancer risk, no matter your weight

Older women who carry some extra body fat may face a heightened risk of breast cancer -- even if their weight is normal, a new study finds.

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Sleepy U.S. teens are running on empty

Most American teenagers are plagued by too little sleep, which can hurt their health and their school performance, federal health officials said Thursday.

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Troubling stroke trend among U.S. moms-to-be

A rare type of stroke is on the rise among pregnant women in the United States, a new study finds.

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Former NFL pros push for end to kids' tackle football

A group of former National Football League greats is urging parents not to let their children play tackle football until they're at least 14 years old

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'Hot' yoga is no better for your heart: study

It's called "hot" yoga because it's practiced in sweltering temperatures, and some research has hinted that it might improve heart health more than traditional yoga.

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Concussion may not be needed to bring on CTE brain disease

Head impacts, not just concussions, may lead to the degenerative brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), according to new research.

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These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

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The second stage of diet resolutions

Factors that help you reach goals include memory, attention and self-control

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Severe bullying tied to mental health woes in teens

Teens who were severely bullied as children are at increased risk for mental health problems and suicide attempts, a Canadian study finds.

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Asthma in America carries $82 billion price tag

The economic cost of asthma in the United States is nearly $82 billion a year, federal health officials report.

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Women seem more prone to winter blues

The increase in depressive symptoms brought on by winter seems to occur more often in women than men, a new study finds.

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Mediterranean diet a recipe for strength in old age

A Mediterranean diet may make seniors less likely to become frail and help them maintain their health and independence, new research suggests.

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Surgery or antibiotics for appendicitis? Here's what patients chose

Even though appendicitis often resolves with the use of antibiotics, the overwhelming majority of Americans would opt for surgery instead, a new survey finds.

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FDA bans use of opioid-containing cough meds by kids

Trying to put a dent in the ongoing opioid addiction crisis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday slapped strict new restrictions on the use of opioid-containing cold and cough products by kids.

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Fewer of America's poor kids are becoming obese

Obesity rates among poor kids may be declining, U.S. health officials report.

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The opioid crisis' hidden victims: children in foster care

As the opioid epidemic continues to grip the United States, the toll on the littlest victims -- the children of addicts -- is mounting, new research shows.

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What to do if your child has chickenpox

Have a child with chickenpox? Don't despair. There are a number of things you can do to care for a child with this disease.

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Respiratory virus lurks as wintertime worry

A common respiratory virus that circulates in winter can pose a serious threat to children, an expert warns.

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Could gene therapy someday eliminate HIV?

Gene therapy may have the potential to eradicate HIV in people infected with the virus, new animal research suggests.

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Prenatal vitamins tied to lower autism risk in kids, study finds

Taking folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy could reduce your child's risk of autism, a new study suggests.

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Goodbye, needles? Patch might be the future for blood-sugar tracking

Developers of a new patch hope to eliminate a big barrier in type 2 diabetes treatment -- painful finger-sticks and injections.

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Most U.S. babies start solid foods too soon

More than half the parents in the United States start feeding their babies solid foods before they're 6 months old -- the age now recommended by health experts, a new study indicates.

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Fresh Fitness classes resume in Carbondale

Updated:

CARBONDALE -- It's a new year and many people are looking to get into shape. The city of Carbondale is teaming up with the SIU Rec Center and the Carbondale Park District for the Fresh Fitness program. 

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Keep Fido warm during arctic blast

As an Arctic front brings frigid temperatures to every region of the United States but the Southwest this week, a veterinarian stresses that your canine companion is also at risk in the extreme cold and snow.

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