Health - WSIL-TV 3 Southern Illinois

Fourth Illinois death reported from synthetic marijuana

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SPRINGFIELD - Illinois public health officials say a fourth person has died after using synthetic marijuana.

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Ice pops recalled due to possible Listeria contamination

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WSIL-TV - If you have ice pops in your freezer, you may want to double check them if you live in Missouri, because they could be contaminated with Listeria. 

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National Prescription Drug Take Back Day

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WSIL-TV - The National Prescription Drug Take Back is happening across the nation this Saturday April 28, 2018 from 10:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M. 

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SIU Nurses unionizing for fair pay

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CARBONDALE, Illinois - Southern Illinois has a nursing shortage, but filling those positions isn't easy especially for the Student Health Center at SIU.  

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Skipping breakfast could lead to weight gain

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WSIL-TV - You've heard it your whole life, "breakfast is the most important meal of the day". 

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House Call: CHESI services Video included

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CAIRO -- Community Health and Emergency Services in Cairo is now managing two critical public health programs in the Southern 7 region.

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Health tip: recognize early signs of autism

Autism may be detected at an early age by paying attention to your baby's social and language skills, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.

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You and your pooch may have similar tummy bacteria

The makeup of bacteria in your dog's digestive tract may be more like your own than you think, researchers say.

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House passes bill to control drug prices

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SPRINGFIELD -- Legislation to keep the price of generic prescription drugs down passes in the House.

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Americans toss out tons of fruits and veggies

Americans may be trying to eat healthy, but they're throwing away mountains of produce in the process, a new study suggests.

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Lawmaker tries to stop porn epidemic Video included

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SPRINGFIELD -- An epidemic growing across the country prompts one Illinois lawmaker to work to put a stop to it.

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'Flexitarian' eating: part vegetarian, part not

If you want to eat more vegetables and less meat, but don't want to give up meat altogether, there's an alternative.

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New drugs may be big advance in lung cancer care

Drugs designed to trigger a patient's immune system may help boost survival for those battling lung cancer, two new studies found.

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Happy hours could shorten your life according to study Video included

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WSIL-TV -  An international team of researchers says they found having just one alcoholic drink a day might be enough to shorten your life expectancy.

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U.S. women less likely than men to get statins after heart attack

Women who survive a heart attack are less likely than men to receive cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that can reduce the risk of another heart attack or stroke, a new study finds.

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Caffeine good for heart health? Study says yes. Video included

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WSIL-TV - Caffeine affects your nervous system, but could it be *good* for your heart?

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Another study finds later school bell brings sleep bonus for teens

Singapore's teens are the world's best on an international test of academic performance, but they pay for it with their sleep.

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Busting myths surrounding cancer and genetic testing

While only 5 percent to 10 percent of cancers are caused by an inherited gene mutation, genetic testing may benefit people with a strong history of family cancer, an expert in genetics suggests.

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Yoga can soothe anxious grade schoolers

Yoga at school might work wonders for the younger set, new research suggests.

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House Call: Walk to Cure Arthritis Video included

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MARION -- The Walk to Cure Arthritis is coming up Saturday, April 21. Rent One Park in Marion is hosting the event this year. 

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Spring sneezin' season has sprung

If you suffer from allergies, you already know that pollen is in the air -- even in the parts of the United States with unseasonably cool temperatures. So what kind of allergy season can we expect this year?

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Aha: four-legged friends can have heart issues, too

Many Americans spend their lives with their pets -- sharing habits, walks and sometimes even the bed.

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FDA approves contact lenses that shade the sun

The lives of contact lens wearers just got a whole lot easier.

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The focus shifts in Alzheimer's research

The way that Alzheimer's disease is defined for research should be based on brain changes rather than symptoms.

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Why Americans' life expectancy is getting longer

Americans appear to be aging slower than they used to, which may help explain recent gains in life expectancy, researchers say.

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Sometimes, headaches can be an emergency. Here's when.

Sometimes, headaches can warn of a serious health issue. That's why it's important to know when to take action

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Stretching can help get seniors moving

Stretching leg muscles every day may benefit seniors and other people with mobility problems, a new study reports.

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'Magnetic pulse' device may be new way to prevent migraines

Self-administered magnetic pulses from a hand-held device may help head off debilitating migraines, researchers report.

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Those with diabetes less likely to see dentist despite health risks

Many adults with diabetes don't see the dentist often enough, even though they're at increased risk for gum disease, researchers say.

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Early promise for eye implant to fight macular degeneration

A new stem cell transplant might help preserve or even restore vision being lost to the dry form of age-related macular degeneration, a new pilot clinical trial has shown.

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Weightlifting injuries common for deployed U.S. troops

An "alarming" number of weightlifting injuries occur among U.S. military personnel in combat zones, according to a new study.

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Red meat tied to higher colon cancer risk for women

Another study, this time in British women, finds that diets high in red meat are linked to higher odds for colon cancer.

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Baby sitters, relatives often unaware of SIDS risk

A baby's risk of death from being placed in an unsafe sleeping position or location is higher when they're under the care of a baby sitter, relative or friend, a new study found.

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Abandoning your workouts may bring on the blues

Before you give up on your exercise program, know that new research suggests the decision may put more than your fitness at risk.

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Many grad students struggle with anxiety, depression

Depression and anxiety is nearly seven times more common among graduate students than in the general population, a new study finds.

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Many pick the wrong drugs for sneezin' season

Hay fever sufferers often choose the wrong medication for their seasonal sniffles, new research suggests.

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For hard-to-manage Type 1 Diabetes, transplant makes life better

New research shows that for people with type 1 diabetes who can no longer sense when their blood sugar levels drop too low, an islet cell transplant can dramatically improve their lives.

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Turn down the music. Here's why.

Parents annoyed by the loud music that their teens listen to might have good reason to worry.

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A 'chipped' tooth reveals what you eat and drink

Tempted to cheat on your diet? You might want to think twice.

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Could coffee perk up your heart health?

Besides staying alert, coffee lovers who drink more than three cups of java a day may lower their risk for clogged arteries, a new Brazilian study suggests.

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MRI sheds new light on brain networks tied to autism

New research suggests that a special MRI technique can spot abnormal connections in the brains of preschoolers with autism.

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House Call: Stop the Bleed training offered to all

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WSIL -- Stop the Bleed is a national campaign to build resilience and better prepare the public to save lives through basic actions to stop life threatening bleeding following everyday emergencies, disasters, and mass-casualty events (like a mass shooting).  

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Depression could be a risk factor for AFib: study

Depression can raise your risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm that's been linked to stroke and heart failure, a new study suggests.

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Tai chi beats aerobics for fibromyalgia pain

If you suffer from fibromyalgia, new research suggests tai chi might do more than aerobic exercise to ease your chronic pain.

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Study weighs heart danger of antibiotics for older women

New research finds that, for women over 60, there's a link between long-term use of antibiotics and heightened odds for heart-linked death.

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Well-done meat may not be good for your blood pressure

You might think twice about how you want that steak cooked.

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Sugary sodas linked again to increased heart risks

Would that ice cold soda be as tempting if you knew that it might shorten your life?

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Red and processed meats linked to liver woes

Bacon lovers, a new study has some bad news for you: Eating a lot of processed and red meats may up your odds for a serious liver condition and insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

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Women may dismiss subtle warning signs of heart disease

Warning signs of heart disease in women, such as fatigue, body aches and upset stomach, may be shrugged off as symptoms of stress or a hectic lifestyle.

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Diet groups can spell diet success

For some people, dieting is easier with emotional support.

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Male birth control pill shows early promise

An attempt to develop a safe and effective "male pill" is making headway, according to preliminary results of a small study.

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Can you be obese but heart-healthy? Study says no

A new British study of nearly 300,000 people dismantles the "obesity paradox," a theory that claims being obese does not necessarily raise heart risks.

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Binge drinking rampant among Americans

Americans are on a binge drinking binge.

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Health tip: recognize an anxiety disorder

Anxiety is a normal response to stress, but if it becomes overwhelming and difficult to conduct your daily routine, it may be time to seek help.

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Coffee may have bigger effect on your body than thought: study

Coffee has been tied to many health benefits. Now, a small study suggests a daily java habit may affect the body's metabolism more extensively than thought.

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Managing pain with fewer opioids after joint replacement

Using two or more pain control methods after hip and knee replacement surgery rather than opioid painkillers alone reduces risks to patients, a new study finds.

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Opioid ODs outpacing other 'deaths of despair'

Though fewer Americans are dying from alcohol abuse, suicide and murder, opioid overdose deaths have risen dramatically in recent decades, a new report finds.

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Three-in-one pill shows promise in beating high blood pressure

A pill that combines three blood pressure-lowering drugs improves people's chances of lowering their high blood pressure, researchers report.

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Fighting a cold or flu? Beware of overdosing on Tylenol

A brutal flu season has had people reaching for relief in their medicine cabinet, but a new study warns that overdosing on acetaminophen (Tylenol) is more common when bugs and viruses are circulating.

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1 in 20 younger women suffers major depression

Depression is a big problem in women during and after pregnancy, but it's also a concern throughout the reproductive years.

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Early colon cancer screening advised for some

From age 50 on, most people are advised to get a colonoscopy every 10 years to screen for colon cancer. But others may need to start screening earlier due to certain risk factors, an expert says.

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House Call: Warm up before working out

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WSIL -- March is National Athletic Trainer Month. Experts say it's important to warm up.

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Sunnier days in youth may mean less odds of MS later

Living in sunnier climes when young might help shield you from multiple sclerosis decades later, new research suggests.

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Falls among elderly cost $50 billion annually

Falls by older Americans have devastating medical and economic consequences, reaching $50 billion a year, a new study finds.

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Blood pressure check? There may soon be an app for that

Someday soon, a simple touch of a finger to a smartphone case might be enough to provide instant, accurate blood pressure readings.

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Ban menthols to help some smokers quit

After the Canadian province of Ontario banned menthol cigarettes, many smokers responded by trying to kick the habit, a new study finds.

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New medication approved for drug-resistant HIV

Trogarzo (ibalizumab-uiyk) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat AIDS-causing HIV that has not responded to other antiretroviral medications.

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Primary care doctors loosen type 2 diabetes goals

The American College of Physicians (ACP) has issued new guidance on managing type 2 diabetes -- including relaxing the long-term blood sugar target called hemoglobin A1C.

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Many Americans think docs order too many tests, meds

Few older Americans believe ordering more tests and drugs is the way to better health care, a new survey finds.

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Don't count on healthy foods to blunt salt's harm

An otherwise healthy diet isn't going to offset damage to your heart from too much salt, a new study suggests.

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Nasty flu season shows more signs of slowing

The brutal flu season continues to ease its grip on the United States, with the latest government data showing that doctor visits are still dropping and less severe strains of the flu are starting to account for more...

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House Call: Colorectal cancer patient shares his experience

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WSIL --  Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in this country.  

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Helping your child navigate the high school years

High school is a major milestone in a teen's life.

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Big outdoor temperature swings tied to heart attack risk

Many people know that extreme cold can raise your chances of having a heart attack, but a new study suggests that wild swings in temperature may do the same.

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Why the flu makes you feel so miserable

If you're unlucky enough to come down with the flu, you can blame your own body for your fever, cough, muscle aches and head-to-toe distress, experts say.

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Toxic metals found in e-cigarette vapor

If you think that "vaping" is a safe alternative to smoking, new research suggests you might be inadvertently inhaling unsafe levels of toxic metals.

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Female hormones may play part in asthma

There may be a link between asthma in women and changes in levels of female hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, researchers report.

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The sooner type 2 diabetes arrives, the worse for your heart

A type 2 diabetes diagnosis that comes early in life carries a deadly load of health risks, new research shows.

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For women, blocked arteries not the only trigger for heart attacks

Women don't need to have blocked arteries to experience a heart attack, a new study points out.

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Antidepressants do work, some better than others: study

Antidepressant drugs actually do help ease depression, countering debate over whether the medications do what they're supposed to, a large research review has found.

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New research debunks two medical marijuana myths

Mention legalizing medical marijuana, and people often think two things:

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Clues to Parkinson's may be shed in tears

Your tears may reveal if you are at risk of Parkinson's disease, preliminary research suggests.

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'Burnout' threatens more than a third of doctors

There's a good chance your doctor is in the middle of a quiet battle with professional burnout, a new study suggests.

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Aspirin as good a clot buster as pricey drugs after joint replacement

Good old aspirin is just as effective as newer, expensive drugs at preventing blood clots after hip or knee replacement, a new clinical trial suggests.

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Newer breast MRI may be more accurate and easier

A new type of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) that doesn't use a contrast agent appears better at detecting what's really cancer and what's likely just a harmless lesion, researchers report.

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Obesity might cause sudden cardiac arrest in the young

Obesity and high blood pressure may play a much greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among young people than previously thought, a new study suggests.

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Pets good medicine for those battling mental ills

Can the adoring gaze of a dog or the comforting purr of a cat be helpful to people with mental illness? Absolutely, new research suggests.

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Lung cancer one of many reasons not to smoke

You already know that smoking causes lung cancer. But tobacco use can lead to other major health problems, too, experts warn.

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House Call: Importance of breakfast (and an easy recipe)

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WSIL -- February is Hot Breakfast Month and we're talking about the importance of starting your day with a meal 

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It's not your imagination: you're hungrier after losing weight

If you find yourself famished after you've managed to diet away a sizable number of pounds, you're not alone.

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First blood test to evaluate potential concussions approved

The first blood test designed to help doctors evaluate whether a suspected brain injury is a concussion has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Another cancer vaccine shows promise in mice

In what researchers call a first step toward personalized vaccines for a multitude of cancers, a vaccine made from stem cells protected mice from tumors.

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FDA approves first blood test to detect concussions

The first blood test to help diagnose a concussion has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Obamacare helped more young women get prenatal care: study

One of the main features of Obamacare -- providing insurance for adults under age 26 through their parents' health plan -- allowed many pregnant young women to obtain prenatal care, new research shows.

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Preemies get a slow start on friendships

As if preemies didn't face enough struggles, a new study finds they have more difficulty making friends, though things improve once they start school.

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FDA says U.S. will now produce critical MRI component

A long-feared shortage of a substance used in millions of medical imaging procedures each year in the United States appears to have been avoided, federal officials report.

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Autism, bipolar and schizophrenia share genetic similarities

By examining brain tissue, researchers say they've found similarities in certain mental illnesses, including autism and schizophrenia.

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Fetal alcohol cases more common than thought: study

More U.S. children may be living with brain damage from prenatal drinking than experts have thought, a new study suggests.

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Crash diets might derail your heart health

Everyone wants a beach-ready body, and many are willing to starve themselves to achieve it quickly. But new research suggests that fat lost on crash diets may clog the heart and reduce its function.

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A hidden source of 'superbugs' in hospitals?

Hospital wastewater systems may play a role in antibiotic resistance, a new study suggests.

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Menopause may worsen rheumatoid arthritis symptoms

Menopause may speed physical decline in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a new study suggests.

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Exercise may help lung cancer surgery go more smoothly

Lung cancer patients can halve their risk of postop complications by taking up an exercise program before their surgery, a new report suggests.

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Weak vaccine making flu season even tougher, CDC says

This flu season continues to be one of the nastiest in years. And it isn't helping that the flu vaccine may be less than 20 percent effective against the season's dominant strain, according to a new Canadian report.

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Cow, soy or almond: which 'milk' is best for you?

Almond milk, soy milk, rice milk and coconut milk may all offer lactose-free alternatives to cow's milk, but new research suggests that the dairy version remains the most nutritious option.

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VA health system failing on mental health care: report

Many U.S. veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars aren't getting needed mental health treatment for conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression or substance abuse, a national panel of experts says.

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Procedure beats drugs for a-fib with heart failure

For people with both atrial fibrillation and heart failure, a procedure called ablation can be life-saving, a new clinical trial shows.

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Memory loss hitting some fentanyl abusers

Using fentanyl or other opioids alongside other illicit drugs could trigger possibly permanent amnesia caused by brain damage, doctors warn.

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Extra body fat may raise breast cancer risk, no matter your weight

Older women who carry some extra body fat may face a heightened risk of breast cancer -- even if their weight is normal, a new study finds.

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Sleepy U.S. teens are running on empty

Most American teenagers are plagued by too little sleep, which can hurt their health and their school performance, federal health officials said Thursday.

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Troubling stroke trend among U.S. moms-to-be

A rare type of stroke is on the rise among pregnant women in the United States, a new study finds.

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Former NFL pros push for end to kids' tackle football

A group of former National Football League greats is urging parents not to let their children play tackle football until they're at least 14 years old

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'Hot' yoga is no better for your heart: study

It's called "hot" yoga because it's practiced in sweltering temperatures, and some research has hinted that it might improve heart health more than traditional yoga.

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Concussion may not be needed to bring on CTE brain disease

Head impacts, not just concussions, may lead to the degenerative brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), according to new research.

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These foods may up your odds for colon cancer

Chowing down on red meat, white bread and sugar-laden drinks might increase your long-term risk of colon cancer, a new study suggests.

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The second stage of diet resolutions

Factors that help you reach goals include memory, attention and self-control

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Severe bullying tied to mental health woes in teens

Teens who were severely bullied as children are at increased risk for mental health problems and suicide attempts, a Canadian study finds.

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Asthma in America carries $82 billion price tag

The economic cost of asthma in the United States is nearly $82 billion a year, federal health officials report.

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Women seem more prone to winter blues

The increase in depressive symptoms brought on by winter seems to occur more often in women than men, a new study finds.

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Mediterranean diet a recipe for strength in old age

A Mediterranean diet may make seniors less likely to become frail and help them maintain their health and independence, new research suggests.

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Surgery or antibiotics for appendicitis? Here's what patients chose

Even though appendicitis often resolves with the use of antibiotics, the overwhelming majority of Americans would opt for surgery instead, a new survey finds.

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FDA bans use of opioid-containing cough meds by kids

Trying to put a dent in the ongoing opioid addiction crisis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday slapped strict new restrictions on the use of opioid-containing cold and cough products by kids.

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Fewer of America's poor kids are becoming obese

Obesity rates among poor kids may be declining, U.S. health officials report.

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The opioid crisis' hidden victims: children in foster care

As the opioid epidemic continues to grip the United States, the toll on the littlest victims -- the children of addicts -- is mounting, new research shows.

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What to do if your child has chickenpox

Have a child with chickenpox? Don't despair. There are a number of things you can do to care for a child with this disease.

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Respiratory virus lurks as wintertime worry

A common respiratory virus that circulates in winter can pose a serious threat to children, an expert warns.

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Could gene therapy someday eliminate HIV?

Gene therapy may have the potential to eradicate HIV in people infected with the virus, new animal research suggests.

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Prenatal vitamins tied to lower autism risk in kids, study finds

Taking folic acid and multivitamins during pregnancy could reduce your child's risk of autism, a new study suggests.

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Goodbye, needles? Patch might be the future for blood-sugar tracking

Developers of a new patch hope to eliminate a big barrier in type 2 diabetes treatment -- painful finger-sticks and injections.

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Most U.S. babies start solid foods too soon

More than half the parents in the United States start feeding their babies solid foods before they're 6 months old -- the age now recommended by health experts, a new study indicates.

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Fresh Fitness classes resume in Carbondale

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CARBONDALE -- It's a new year and many people are looking to get into shape. The city of Carbondale is teaming up with the SIU Rec Center and the Carbondale Park District for the Fresh Fitness program. 

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Keep Fido warm during arctic blast

As an Arctic front brings frigid temperatures to every region of the United States but the Southwest this week, a veterinarian stresses that your canine companion is also at risk in the extreme cold and snow.

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How to kick the smoking habit for good

If one of your New Year's resolutions is to quit smoking, there are a number of ways to improve your chances of success, an expert in tobacco treatment says.

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Asthma worse for overweight preschoolers: study

Preschoolers with asthma may have worse symptoms if they're overweight.

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Epidemic of opioid abuse is top health story of 2017

The millions of Americans caught in the grip of an addiction to opioids -- prescription painkillers or heroin -- remained the leading health news story of the past year.

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Kidney disease can lead to diabetes, not just the other way around

Kidney disease increases the risk for diabetes, a new study finds.

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Eat your greens . . . and maybe boost an aging brain

People who eat leafy green vegetables every day may maintain a sharper mind as they age, a new study suggests.

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Cancer survivors often face another hurdle: faster aging

Treatments that help people beat cancer also can cause them to age prematurely and die sooner, Mayo Clinic researchers report.

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FDA approves gene therapy for rare form of blindness

A new gene therapy to treat children and adults with a rare type of inherited vision loss has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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There's still no proven way to prevent Alzheimer's

Medical science has failed to prove that any treatment, therapy or brain exercise can help prevent dementias such as Alzheimer's disease, an extensive new review has concluded.

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Stamping 'smoking kills' on cigarettes may keep teens from the habit

A grim reminder -- "Smoking Kills" -- emblazoned right on a cigarette may help young people avoid the deadly habit.

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Live close to a gym? You're probably a bit trimmer

When it comes to staying fit, research suggests it really is about location, location, location.

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Zika babies facing increasing health problems with age

Most children born with brain abnormalities caused by the Zika virus are facing severe health and developmental challenges at 2 years of age, a new study suggests.

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Drug may help surgical patients stop opioids sooner

Opioid painkillers after surgery can be the first step toward addiction for some patients. But a common drug might cut the amount of narcotics that patients need, a new study finds.

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Are men just 'babies' when they get the flu? Maybe not

As winter rolls into town, so does the flu and all its miserable symptoms.

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Tried to quit but still smoking? Help's on the way

When it comes to kicking the smoking habit, if at first you don't succeed, try, try again, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

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Is there a best time of day for exercise?

Many studies have tried to pinpoint the best time of day to exercise for peak performance and best results. But most of these studies were designed for elite athletes.

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Just a little weight loss may cut breast cancer risk

It's never too late for women to lose weight to lower their breast cancer risk, a new study suggests.

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Moms' soda habit in pregnancy may boost kids' odds for asthma

Kids are more likely to develop asthma if their moms chug sugary drinks during pregnancy, a new study suggests.

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Have eczema? No need for bleach baths, study suggests

Bathing in water is just as effective for the treatment of eczema as bathing in a bleach solution, a new review of previous research indicates.

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As hearing fades with age, dementia risk may rise

Age can often bring a loss of hearing, and for some, mental decline in the form of dementia. But are the two linked?

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Gene discovery may help fight Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease has long remained a deadly mystery.

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Later school start times do help kids feel rested: study

Later school start times could help teens get the amount of sleep they need, according to a new study.

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For teens, vaping today may lead to smoking tomorrow

The e-cigarette may not be just a "healthier alternative" to smoking for teens. New research shows that teens who vape may be more apt to use tobacco cigarettes later on.

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Gum disease tied to yet another deadly illness

Add one more reason to why you should brush and floss regularly: Gum disease bacteria are now tied to higher odds of esophageal cancer.

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People with epilepsy may gain from common sleep apnea treatment

It's been used by many people to help ease sleep apnea, but new research suggests the CPAP mask may also help ease seizures in people with epilepsy.

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Do receding hairlines mean receding heart health in men?

Preliminary research hints -- but cannot prove -- that men who lose their hair relatively early in life might be at heightened heart risk.

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Newborns in pain might not show it

Just because your newborn isn't a crybaby doesn't mean he doesn't feel pain, new research suggests.

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New migraine drugs show promise

Two new migraine drugs have shown promise in late-stage clinical trials.

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More docs specializing in nursing home care

More doctors in the United States are turning to a new clinical specialty -- nursing home care.

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With diabetes, be on the alert for foot sores

Having diabetes means keeping track of what you eat, how much you exercise, your blood sugar levels and even the condition of your feet.

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Brush up on fall allergies before tackling the leaves

Fall yard work can stir up allergies, but there are ways to reduce the risk of flare-ups, an ear, nose and throat specialist says.

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For seniors, any physical activity is better than none

Don't try saying you're too or too busy to exercise, especially after that calorie-laden Thanksgiving dinner.

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Who's most distracted behind the wheel?

Texting, talking on cellphones, eating, drinking -- distractions such as these are a driving hazard, and are more likely to occur among young men, new research shows.

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Insulin pill may delay type 1 diabetes in some

It's often said that timing is everything. New research suggests this may be true when giving an insulin pill to try to prevent or delay type 1 diabetes.

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Almost 21 million worldwide now have access to HIV meds

The number of people with HIV who take life-saving antiretroviral medications has increased by tens of millions worldwide in recent decades, a United Nations report says.

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Is a common shoulder surgery useless?

New research casts doubt on the true effectiveness of a common type of surgery used to ease shoulder pain.

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Opioid crisis hitting boomers, millennials hardest

The U.S. opioid epidemic seems to be taking its biggest toll on the baby boomer and millennial generations, a new study suggests.

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How to spot an eating disorder

Eating disorders are common in the United States. But they're hard to identify and tough to fix.

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Flu shot could help your kid avoid hospital

There's an easy way for parents to help cut their child's chances of ending up in the hospital with the flu -- get them vaccinated, researchers say.

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Shaming overweight kids only makes things worse

Overweight kids who are shamed or stigmatized are more likely to binge eat or isolate themselves than to make positive changes such as losing weight, a leading pediatricians' group says.

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Obamacare may have helped more Americans quit smoking

States that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act saw a greater increase in low-income adults who quit smoking than did states that did not expand Medicaid, a new study found.

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'Boomers' doing better at avoiding eye disease of aging

Macular degeneration is a major cause of vision loss in older Americans. But new research shows that baby boomers are somehow avoiding the illness at higher rates than their parents did.

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Why a headache feels so draining

For many people, nothing's more draining than a throbbing headache or toothache. Scientists now think they know why.

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Weighing too much or too little when pregnant can be risky

For women contemplating having a baby, new research adds to the evidence suggesting that starting a pregnancy at a normal weight is best.

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Is meth use destroying vets' hearts?

Methamphetamine appears to be damaging the hearts of U.S. military veterans at an increasing rate, researchers report.

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Definition of high blood pressure drops

Nearly half of all adult Americans will be considered to have high blood pressure under new guidelines issued Monday by the nation's top heart health organizations.

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Younger people with diabetes have 7 times greater risk of sudden heart death

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(HealthDay News) -- People younger than 50 with diabetes have a seven-times higher risk of dying from sudden cardiac death, preliminary research suggests. 

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Binge-watchers, beware: long tv time poses clot risk

If you love to while away a weekend watching a season's worth of episodes from a favorite TV series, you may inadvertently put yourself at risk for developing a dangerous blood clot.

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Switching to whole grain foods could trim your waistline

Put down that forkful of perfectly twirled white spaghetti, and grab a plate of whole grain pasta instead.

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Does your pet have a weight problem? Here's how to tell

Cats with diabetes, dogs with cancer, birds with high cholesterol or even rabbits who cannot turn around to clean themselves -- what do these animals all have in common?

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A dangerous new twist on cyberbullying

As if the idea of teen cyberbullying isn't harrowing enough, a new study warns of a strange twist in which kids anonymously post hurtful messages -- to themselves.

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Yoga may give lung cancer patients, caregivers a boost

For advanced lung cancer patients, yoga appears to help improve their overall physical function, stamina and mental health.

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Helping children cope when a mass tragedy strikes

Mass slayings, like the church shooting in Texas Sunday that left at least 26 dead, are hard enough for adults to comprehend. For children, these tragedies can make the world seem like a terrifying place.

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Older women can 'walk away from the grim reaper'

Ladies, slip on your sneakers and walk briskly every day, and you might prolong your life.

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Social media can help boost weight loss success

Struggling to lose weight? Maybe posting that selfie on social media can help, researchers say.

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About half of Americans get health care in ER

When Americans need medical care, almost one in two people choose the emergency room, a new study reveals.

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5 ways to eat more veggies

It's a healthy habit we try to instill in our kids though we don't always do it ourselves -- eating more vegetables every day.

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Are artery-opening stents for chest pain a waste of time?

With findings that some experts believe could change cardiovascular care, a new study suggests that the placebo effect of stents in heart patients with chest pain may be far more pronounced than thought.

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Do rising cancer drug prices warrant regulation?

Cancer drug prices in the United States keep rising steadily, a new study says.

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'Drug courts,' treatment focus of new White House opioid strategy

Steering opioid addicts toward treatment programs instead of prisons, while tightening federal policies on opioid prescribing, could curb the opioid epidemic, President Donald Trump's opioid crisis commission said Wednesday.

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Rheumatoid arthritis linked to risk of COPD

People with rheumatoid arthritis appear to have a higher risk of the lung condition chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), researchers report.

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Where do grains fit in your diet?

To cut calories, you may be tempted to cut out carbs in the form of grains. But that could be a mistake -- for a variety of reasons.

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Kids' high blood pressure often overlooked

One in every 30 children in the United States has high blood pressure. Now, new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics may help doctors screen children 3 years and older for the condition.

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Gene therapy may fight brain cancer's return

A new form of gene therapy shows promise in battling recurrent brain cancer.

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Botox may offer new hope for young migraine sufferers

Botox injections may help bring relief to children suffering from migraines, a small study suggests.

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Could cataract surgery lengthen older women's lives?

Women who undergo cataract surgery may get an unexpected dividend: longer life.

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Controversial chemical can linger on your toothbrush

Triclosan -- a potentially harmful antibacterial agent used in some toothpastes -- accumulates in toothbrush bristles, researchers report.

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Are HIV and AIDS poised for a comeback?

The advent of powerful drugs in the mid-1990s brought remarkable gains in survival for HIV patients who had access to the medications.

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